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Why We Observe Memorial Day

by Melissa Thompson


Memorial Day weekend has become a holiday weekend that people look forward to all winter and spring.  It is the de facto start of the summer season and it’s filled with cookouts, camping trips, and family gatherings.  But, it’s easy to forget the actual reason we observe Memorial Day when you’re sitting by the pool contemplating your summer vacation.  The historical significance of the day is much more than a three-day weekend filled with relaxation and celebration.

Memorial Day is a solemn day of remembrance for all who have died serving our country in the armed forces.  It began after the Civil War, which claimed more lives than any conflict in U.S. history, to honor the Union and Confederate dead, and was originally known as Decoration Day. By the late 1860s, Americans began holding springtime tributes to their fallen soldiers by decorating their graves with flowers and reciting prayers.  It soon became a nationwide date of remembrance held on May 30, 1868.  That date was chosen because it did not coincide with any particular battle.

Decoration Day gradually became known as Memorial Day and included military personnel who died in all wars.  It was observed on May 30th for decades until 1968, when Congress passed the Uniform Monday Holiday Act, which established Memorial Day as the last Monday in May so that federal workers would get a three-day weekend.  The same law made Memorial Day a federal holiday.

Across the United States cities and towns will host Memorial Day parades that include military personnel and members of veterans’ organizations.  Washington DC, New York City, and Chicago are known for hold some of the largest parades to commemorate this day. 

Even if you can’t make it to a parade, you can still observe the day by visiting cemeteries and memorials, or even just taking a moment of silence to thank those who have sacrificed their lives for our freedom.  

Memphis National Cemetery

Memphis National Cemetery on Memorial Day - Photo Credit: youtube.com

Getting Your Gas Grill Ready for Outdoor Cooking

by Melissa Thompson


Memorial Day Weekend is one week away, and with it comes the unofficial start of the summer season. For many families, summer means cooking on the grill.  One of the best things about cooking out on the grill is that there are fewer pots and pans to wash than with stovetop cooking.  While you don’t have to scrub down your gas grill to shiny perfection after each use, it is important to give it a deep clean every now and then to make sure it runs safely and efficiently.  Here’s how!

  • Gather your cleaning supplies - You may want to use gloves and you will need a grill brush or some other type of cleaning brush.  You will also need old cleaning rags or paper towels, a bristle brush or putty knife, and soap and water.
     
  • Turn off the gas supply - This is very important!  Make sure the gas supply is turned off or play it extra safe and remove the gas tank from the grill while cleaning it.Gas Grill Safety
     
  • Remove the grill grates - Pull them out so you can give them a thorough cleaning . Scrub them with a grill brush or other coarse brush.
     
  • Clean anything covering the burners - Remove any V-shaped metal heat tents, ceramic briquettes, or lava stones that cover the burners and brush them clean.  You will want all the gas grill parts to be spic and span. Anatomy of a Gas Grill Parts Guide
     
  • Clean the burner tubes - Lightly brush the burner tubes and make sure all the gas ports are clean and open. How to Clean Your Gas Grill Burners
     
  • Clean the bottom of the grill and the lid - Brush or wipe any debris out of the bottom of the grill. If there is peeling black stuff (usually carbon flakes and grease) on the grill lid or bottom, use a bristle brush or putty knife to scrape it off.
     
  • Clean the grease collection tray - Use soap and water to clean the grease collection tray and replace any disposable pans as needed.  Make sure to dispose of grease properly - pour it into an empty can or bottle, wait for it to harden, then throw the whole thing away.
     
  • Wipe down the outside of the grill - With a rag or paper towel, wipe down the outside of the grill and any side trays using soap and water.
     
  • Put the grill back together - Now you’re ready for a cookout!!

If you are in the market to buy or sell a home in the Memphis area, contact professional Realtor, Melissa Thompson, and let her help you with all your real estate needs!  Give her a call today at 901-729-9526!

Photo Credit: wallimpix.com

Happy Memorial Day Weekend!

by Melissa Thompson

Happy Memorial Day!

by Melissa Thompson

Three years after the Civil War ended, on May 5, 1868, the head of an organization of Union veterans — the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) — established Decoration Day as a time for the nation to decorate the graves of the war dead with flowers.Maj. Gen. John A. Logan declared that Decoration Day should be observed on May 30. It is believed that date was chosen because flowers would be in bloom all over the country.

Memorial Day is an American holiday, observed on the last Monday of May, honoring the men and women who died while serving in the U.S. military. Originally known as Decoration Day, it originated in the years following the Civil War and became an official federal holiday in 1971. Many Americans observe Memorial Day by visiting cemeteries or memorials, holding family gatherings and participating in parades. Unofficially, it marks the beginning of the summer season.

National Moment of Remembrance

To ensure the sacrifices of America ’s fallen heroes are never forgotten, in December 2000, the U.S. Congress passed and the president signed into law “The National Moment of Remembrance Act,” P.L. 106-579, creating the White House Commission on the National Moment of Remembrance. The commission’s charter is to “encourage the people of the United States to give something back to their country, which provides them so much freedom and opportunity” by encouraging and coordinating commemorations in the United States of Memorial Day and the National Moment of Remembrance.

The National Moment of Remembrance encourages all Americans to pause wherever they are at 3 p.m. local time on Memorial Day for a minute of silence to remember and honor those who have died in service to the nation. As Moment of Remembrance founder Carmella LaSpada states: “It’s a way we can all help put the memorial back in Memorial Day.”

Memorial Day, an American Holiday!

by Melissa Thompson

Memorial Day, an American holiday observed on the last Monday of May, honors men and women who died while serving in the U.S. military. Originally known as Decoration Day, it originated in the years following the Civil War and became an official federal holiday in 1971. Many Americans observe Memorial Day by visiting cemeteries or memorials, holding family gatherings and participating in parades. Unofficially, at least, it marks the beginning of summer.

MEMORIAL DAY AN AMERICAN HOLIDAY

by Melissa Hayes Thompson

Memorial Day, an American holiday observed on the last Monday of May, honors men and women who died while serving in the U.S. military. Originally known as Decoration Day, it originated in the years following the Civil War and became an official federal holiday in 1971. Many Americans observe Memorial Day by visiting cemeteries or memorials, holding family gatherings and participating in parades. Unofficially, at least, it marks the beginning of summer.

Displaying blog entries 1-6 of 6

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